Quick Reference




Alcohol Poisoning



What are the signs?
  • Unconscious or semi-conscious and cannot be awakened
  • Skin is cold or clammy and has pale or bluish color
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Slow breathing – less than eight breaths per minute
  • Vomiting while “sleeping” or passed out, and not waking up after vomiting.
  • Eyes rolling back into head
If a person has ANY of these symptoms, they need help! 
  • Don’t leave the person alone—turn the person on his/her side to prevent choking in case of vomiting.
  • It’s important to get help ASAP. Your friend will appreciate the fact that you care, and you will NOT get in trouble for helping someone with alcohol poisoning. 
  • PLEASE, do not be afraid to help a friend or fellow student in need!

Safety Concerns


Sexual Assault

Alcohol impairs your judgment and lowers your inhibitions, and parties and crowd atmospheres provide more opportunities and cover for unwanted touching or sexual advances.

For more info, go to the UConn Women's Center Sexual Assault Page:
http://womenscenter.uconn.edu/issues/sexual_assault.php

Theft

If you've invited people you don't know to your home, you and your guests may be more susceptible to theft. Drunk people can be easy targets, and you might not notice that your stuff is missing until the next day when the thief is long gone.

Injury

Crowds at large parties can be dangerous for intoxicated people, especially in enclosed spaces. There is a higher risk of being trampled or assaulted, whether intentionally or not. Apartment balconies can become crowded, increasing the risk for intoxicated people to fall. Standing on roofs or high decks is especially dangerous for drunk people. Additionally, when your Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) rises to a certain level (likely between 0.15 and 0.25), you may not be able to feel pain if you are injured.


Transportation Solutions


UConn Police serves students with the HuskyWatch (860-486-4809) escort service, but they will not transport intoxicated students. You can find more info throughout this guide and on the Husky Watch website: www.police.uconn.edu/huskywatch.html.

GUARD Dogs, an entirely student-run operation, provides a non-judgmental and anonymous ride to students to their on- or off-campus home between 11PM and 3AM on Friday and Saturday nights. Their phone number is 860-486-8000. You can find more info on GUARD Dogs at: www.guarddogs.uconn.edu/.


Quick Contacts and Websites


For emergencies, call 911!